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The Sydney Harbour Bridge

RRP $19.95

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On 19 March, 1932, after nine years of planning and building, more than a million Australians crossed the newly opened Sydney Harbour Bridge, the largest arch bridge in the world. This revised edition of Peter Spearitt's biography of the Bridge celebrates the 80th anniversary of the Sydney Harbour Bridge in March 2012. It tells the extraordinary story of the Bridge's design and construction, the drama of its official opening, and the way it has taken a central place in Sydney's celebrations and become a much-loved symbol of the city. The Bridge has inspired great art and drawn visitors from all over the world to marvel and climb it, yet is still so familiar that Sydneysiders refer to it endearingly as the coathanger. The Sydney Harbour Bridge celebrates not only a magnificent structure, but the people who use it.

About the Author

Peter Spearritt is a leading historian, the former executive director of the Brisbane Institute, and a current professor at the University of Queensland. He has published more than 20 books, including Australians and the Monarchy, Electrifying Sydney, Sydney’s Century: A History, Holiday Business: Tourism in Australia since 1870, and Trading Places: Australian Travel Posters.


30 Days In Sydney

RRP $23.99

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Novelist Peter Carey draws the reader into a wild and wonderful journey of discovery and re-discovery of Sydney.

After living in New York for ten years novelist Peter Carey returned home to Sydney with the idea of capturing its ebullient character via the four elements. 'I would never seek to define Manhattan by asking my New York friends for stories of Earth and Air and Fire and Water,' he writes, 'but that is exactly what was in my mind as I walked through immigration at Kingsford Smith International Airport.'

Carey draws the reader helplessly into a wild and wonderful journey of discovery and re-discovery. Reading this book is a very physical experience, as bracing as the southerly buster that sometimes batters Sydney's beauteous shores. Famous visual extravaganzas such as Bondi Beach, the Opera House, the Harbour Bridge and the Blue Mountains all take on a strange new intensity when exposed to the penetrating gaze of Peter and his friends.

Thirty Days in Sydney offers the reader a private glimpse behind the glittering facades and venetian blinds. It will exhilarate and enchant all who visit.

About the Author

Peter Carey was born in 1943 in Australia and lives in New York. He is the author of the highly acclaimed selection of short stories, The Fat Man in History, nine previous novels, Bliss, Illywhacker (shortlisted for the 1985 Booker Prize), Oscar and Lucinda (winner of the 1988 Booker Prize), The Tax Inspector, The Unusual Life of Tristan Smith, Jack Maggs (winner of the 1998 Commonwealth Writers Prize), True History of the Kelly Gang (winner of the 2001 Booker Prize), My Life as a Fake, Theft, a book for children, The Big Bazoohley, and a work of non-fiction, Wrong About Japan.


A Short History Of The Egyptian Obelisks

RRP $18.99

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An excerpt from the beginning of Chapter I. Characteristics of an Obelisk:

OF all the monuments of Egypt the most striking and the most characteristic are the Obelisk and the Pyramid; both of them solar emblems: the one significant of the rising, and the other of the setting sun; and both alike dating from that pre-historic period of civilization which was in perfection ere the Father of the Faithful had descended from Ur of the Chaldees, or the Turanian races of India were oppressed by their Aryan brethren.

For so long a succession of centuries has the Obelisk been admired and copied in the various cities of Africa, Asia, and Europe; Alexandria, Constantinople, and Rome, that the original peculiarities of the structure itself have been occasionally lost sight of: and any single vertical monument that could not be exactly described as a column, has been set down as an obelisk. Hence there is still in popular acceptance some inaccuracy as to the exact form that an obelisk should assume: and it becomes necessary at once to define what an obelisk is, and what it is not as to external form, before we proceed to examine the intention of its symbolism. An obelisk, or tekhen, to give it its Egyptian name, then, is a monument composed of a single quadrangular upright stone, having its four faces inclined towards each other; and in section, all its angles, right angles, and all its sides; parallel to each other ; its height is not less than that of ten diameters, taken at the base; and its apex is abruptly terminated by a small pyramidion, whose faces are inclined at about an angle of sixty degrees. The obelisk is generally supported upon a quadrangular base, the height of which is approximately that of a cube and a half, and which is also, like the obelisk, composed of a single stone, this base is further supported by two broad and deep steps. It is not necessary that the four sides of either obelisk or base ' have in section the same width, provided that each opposite side is exactly equal; but it is necessary that jail the lines of the monument be right lines; and that it should have no more than four sides. A polygonal, or a cylindrical monolith is not an obelisk; on the other hand, obelisks may be either inscribed or uninscribed; but the ornamentation is never in relief, other than the low sunken relief used in Egyptian art, and known as incavo relievo; and the inscription is always vertical with the lines of the monument, and not horizontal. It must be added, also, that entasis or that slight curvature of all long lines, which is so marked a feature in classic architecture, is wholly foreign to the design of an obelisk in the best period of Pharaohnic art.


Memoir Of The Rev. Sydney Smith 2 Volume Set

RRP $12.99

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First published in 1855 and reissued here in the second edition of that year, this two-volume work celebrates the life of the author, wit and clergyman Sydney Smith (1771-1845). A founder of the second Edinburgh Review, Smith is best remembered for his entertaining observations and witticisms. The work comprises a memoir, written by Smith's daughter Saba Holland (1802-66), and a selection of letters, edited by Sarah Austin (1793-1867). Together, the volumes offer private insights into a man who lived much of his life in the public eye. Sharing her father's sense of humour, Holland peppers her memoir in Volume 1 with many of his best jokes, while also emphasising his character as a compassionate clergyman, loving father and dutiful friend. Volume 2 continues with Smith's letters, selected for the light that they shed on his character.



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Sydney Sydney Hotel Travel Sydney History Sydney
Sydney Style Annual Festival Italian Food Italian Wine
Italian Cuisine

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